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how not to land a LiteSpeed

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had a good flight though : )

 

You need to get your money back for those wheels :)  Didn't look like they did much rolling...

P.S.  Whack.

My earlier landings were without wheels:

 

 

I think with wheels i encounter some cognitive dissonance about how to end the flight. Without wheels there really is only one choice and i can make that happen. I need to. I got the wheels for extra safety but i think they are psyching me out in a way.

They roll pretty well, it was mostly the way the glider set down suddenly after that half ass flare that prevented it. But they are not as effective as pneumatics, for sure.

 

 

 

 

Thery're called 'whackels' wink

But seriously folks--many pilots have reported good results from doing in-flight landing practice. I've made a few videos on this topic. Currently, I have one of these posted and several pilots have told me they found the video along with their own practice to be useful. I need to do it myself periodically or my skills slip.

Here moyes litesport 137   ( DHG )  flew great time then  got worried no wheel on basetube

then DHG  have to do near landing then whack because no wheel ( dug to grass )  then now i MUST have use landing wheel for extra safety in near future and my life time to flyable ... no matter save your expesives downtube !! 

 

Actual video ==>> 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwtaT-BcPh4

 

 

Fly Safe 

DHG 

The wheel has been around for quite awhile now. So has a means of controlling roll that has proven to be very effective. Put both on a hang glider, and you've got something to be proud of. If we stick with it, we'll get it right someday. 

    "Patience is a virtue, and virtue is it's own reward."

Even on some of my full flair landings, i let the glider settle down

on the wheels, for a usual 6-inch roll-out at the end, ; do that so

the fake legs don't take the weight of the glider, and it's good practice

for when-/-if i land out in a rockey aria , filled with cactus plants.

Some of those landings don't look pretty ; but i almost never bend

a down-tube, or stuff on the fraim.

 

My WW, U-2  has the same wheels as the ones on the lightspeed posted

by the OP ; they work great for a roll-out landing on the grass, but i'd go for a ful

flair in softer sand or other.

 

Bille

Andrew, it's good to hear from you! I didn't get to ask you about an invention you made, please gimmee a ring 909 337 4333.

The Millenium is a good glider I'm sure, but I haven't flown one, I flew an Atos and they are good gliders. Less effort required to roll, but the roll rate is miserably slow, not much better than a flex wing.

When "hang glider" is mentioned, folks just naturally visualize a flex wing or a rigid wing aft-swept flying wing type aircraft, usually a high aspect ratio low twist model.

What is missing in our choices is a relatively low aspect ratio very large and very slow flying glider with a roll control method that is more authoritative and faster responding than either weight-shift or with spoilerons. And fully cantilevered and with good aerodynamic fairing of a comfortably positioned pilot, who won't get tossed around up over the top of the thing when the going gets tough. A truly airworthy flying apparatus. One where, if desired, the pilot can override pitch stability for full-stall "parachute" landings, and for safer launching in high winds.

For some odd reason that I can't quite fathom, Hg pilots seem to be happy with what is currently available for purchase, even though most of them regularly must make an adjustment to a block and tackle main sheet control when faced with having to choose between a flat glide angle or the ability to steer the thing.

It's 2017 almost 18, and we're putting up with this? It is unacceptable to me, so I'm not flying until I can have a glider that jumps when I say frog and is designed from the git go with a really good and rugged launching/landing wheeled undercarriage. And oh yeah, a stall speed as low or lower than a Pg.

  In short, a Brave New Glider for our brave new world.The Wrights recognized that weight-shift was an inadequate means of roll control 116 years ago, and made their glider so that the pilots muscle power went straight to warping the wing, instead of our rather pathetic method of moving our mass and praying for the side affect of wing warping.

Please note that there are few, if any, pilots that agree with me.I'm just a stand up philosopher, not an engineer. But I'm also a veteran of 40+ years of Hg, and just don't want to have any more of those moments where even with maximum effort applied I narrowly avoid a wreck because of limited roll control, like I said, in 2018 we really oughta be able to design airworthy gliders. And notice I said "gliders" not "hang" or "para".

We can do much better, and I for one believe we will. It's just gonna take more folks like me getting fed up with bullshit and deciding they just ain't gonna take it any more.  In the meanwhile back at the ranch, I'm really enjoying my restoration of a Hobie Hawk, and playing with the cats. I miss flying, but I need to get awful damn horny to settle for second best. I deserve the best glider that can be built. I'm no good with math so I couldn't be an engineer. But I'm not too bad at imagineering. And that's the fun part.